Weirdness

To one degree or another, all of my novels involve the supernatural.  Not explicitly for the most part – they’re not populated by material ghoulies, but rather visited by them peripherally, questionably – but the possibility of the impossible runs through the work, with the intention of dizzying the characters’ relationship to reality as well as the readers’ (if all goes well).  But that’s just to describe what’s happening on the page.  What’s considerably more odd is when the weirdness of the books graduate to the weirdness of readers’ real lives.

It hasn’t happened a lot.  But it has happened.  A reader will write or approach me after I’ve given a reading or talk.  Their eyes are often downcast with embarrassment or, once or twice, widened with real fear.  They will then tell me how something from one of my books has been sighted in their own experience, as though a spirit from the novel has transferred to haunt them.

I don’t want to suggest that this has led to any kind of Amityville Horror-style disruptions or anything.  Nothing actually bad has been triggered.  Usually, it’s just someone thinking they’ve seen a character from The Killing Circle on a Toronto street, or having a vivid dream about The Boy from The Guardians.  Chilling, perhaps, but only mildly freaky from a How-Do-You-Explain-That? point of view.

Until now.

The publication of the new novel, The Demonologist, is still several months off, but there has now been three distinct episodes of higher-grade weirdness reported to me by early readers of the manuscript.  For the first time ever, one of them is me.

I’m actually compiling a little file of these things, as I find it interesting, even if I don’t take it too seriously.  Still, if any more of this kind of stuff goes on I might have to write something about it.  For now, I’ve just been nudged a half-inch closer to wondering about the magical aspects of giving life to stories, where “magical” is intended in the “dark arts” sense and not the Walt Disney, “feel like a carefree kid again” sense.

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2 Responses to Weirdness

  1. Carol Herndon says:

    Hi Andrew, love all your books. I was born in England, grew up in Toronto and now live in L.A. Anyway, wow!!! RE: these weird things, plus someone “seeing” a character from “The Killing Circle” on the street. So when are you going to write about this stuff.

    I’ll tell you the weirdest thing that happened to me. After my husband Ron died, a neighbor reported seeing and talking to him the day he (probably) died. This led to me bugging the coroner endlessly and my dad going to view Ron’s body. Truly bizarre. anyway, keep up the fantasic work, chh

  2. Kristine says:

    Oh no. Now I won’t be able to read your new book and I was really looking forward to it. I am too spooked even thinking about how it may unleash something. Like Satan. Rats. Looking forward to your next novel about unicorns and magical castle made of ice cream.

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